How to Get Your Medtech News Published

Hint: it’s all about relationships

Is your goal to get an interview for your CEO during a tradeshow? Do you need media outlets to cover your product launch? Or maybe a key clinical user has published milestone clinical results using the company’s technology?

Most companies feel they have news to share that is important for everyone to read. Many times, it is not but you have been tasked with getting it published. Where do you begin? First think about YOUR target – the journalists and editors.

It doesn’t matter about the scenario. What matters is that you have news that’s relevant and credible for editors, journalists and other media influencers to learn more about, or feel is beneficial to share with their audiences. The key is to be prepared ahead of time and make sure they are aware of the news and that there’s ‘more to come’ from a trustworthy industry leader. So how do you get there?

Do your research

To cultivate a relationship, know what each media source is personally interested in and what they write about—are they interested in the tech story or clinical data validation? Do they report on company news or the industry as a whole? Some journalists will summarize press releases and reach out to an end user or the company CEO for a quote. Often, editors are interested in full-length interviews or receiving an article from a company that is written in first person—articles they can publish with little or no effort. When pitching your story, appeal to their personal interests.

  • Sign up for the media outlet’s newsletters to stay up to date on what they focus on.
  • Follow the LinkedIn and Twitter feeds of the editor and journalists or influencers for each news source.
  • Always be educated on who they interview—from doctors to CEOs to other leading industry experts.

Journalists receive about 30 pitches a day and decline or don’t respond most of the time because it’s not relevant to what they cover. (Muckrack 2024)

Build symbiotic relationships

At some point, you need to introduce yourself and let your media contacts know you represent your company’s news. Ask what they may be interested in, so you don’t waste their time. Mention a few articles you enjoyed reading. Don’t ask them for anything other than to introduce yourself when you first reach out.

  • Attending a tradeshow? Ask the editor or journalist to stop by your booth for a short tour over coffee and introduce them to your subject matter experts, so they know your company has identified people that will help them with their job. If they decline, stop by their booth and ask them what they find most interesting from all the attendees. Just listen and learn!
  • Email your contacts when you have valid clinical data to share that builds up a technology. A lot of times, the editor will decline an article because your press release covers the news. That’s ok. Keep updating them on clinical data or milestones as they happen. Sourcing end users at the oncology center is always valuable information.
  • If there is an industry trend that is being discussed, ask your contacts what their views are or comment when appropriate. Be a part of their world by offering insights from your company’s subject matter experts.

Most articles are now published digitally (69%) compared to print (19%) so the positive news is your article is quick to be published and can be updated if or as needed. (Muckrack 2024)

Be the credible, go-to source

  • Have your subject matter experts prepped for interviews and readily available. This includes key opinion leaders that use your technology at hospitals and clinics and the researchers and clinical personnel at your company.
  • Write a contributed or bylined article. Unlike an article written by a reporter about a company or its products, these articles are authored by a thought leader at the company and are meant to lend a vendor-neutral perspective on topics relevant to a publication’s readers. Journalists are busy, so don’t forget to add value with assets (images, quotes, links, etc.)
  • Stay on top of industry trends and insert your company ASAP! As an example, a public figure announces a cancer diagnosis, it is covered in national and/or global news sources. Many doctors are interviewed on what the disease means and latest technologies to treat it, even if the person doesn’t share what treatments they will have. This is a great opportunity to offer your technology press contacts a list of FAQs and a doctor willing to speak on your technology for the disease. Patient education is always needed.

Journalists say their most trusted sources are subject matter experts (82%) over CEOs (46%) and company PR professionals. (Muckrack 2024)

G3 Medical Marketing offers expertise in media relations— from building press-ready materials to a solid rapport with news outlets that your stakeholders turn to for their news.

We’re here to:

  • Help you be seen as the industry expert
  • Position your company as a thought leader
  • Increase your visibility on news that matters
  • Help you quickly reach out to relevant news sources
  • Lead your company to other opportunities, including speaking engagements, interviews and quotes in leading media outlets

Reach out to find out how we can help you build a credible subject matter expert list and be prepared to share your company news whenever it happens!

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Hint: it’s all about relationships

Is your goal to get an interview for your CEO during a tradeshow? Do you need media outlets to cover your product launch? Or maybe a key clinical user has published milestone clinical results using the company’s technology?

Most companies feel they have news to share that is important for everyone to read. Many times, it is not but you have been tasked with getting it published. Where do you begin? First think about YOUR target – the journalists and editors.

It doesn’t matter about the scenario. What matters is that you have news that’s relevant and credible for editors, journalists and other media influencers to learn more about, or feel is beneficial to share with their audiences. The key is to be prepared ahead of time and make sure they are aware of the news and that there’s ‘more to come’ from a trustworthy industry leader. So how do you get there?

Do your research

To cultivate a relationship, know what each media source is personally interested in and what they write about—are they interested in the tech story or clinical data validation? Do they report on company news or the industry as a whole? Some journalists will summarize press releases and reach out to an end user or the company CEO for a quote. Often, editors are interested in full-length interviews or receiving an article from a company that is written in first person—articles they can publish with little or no effort. When pitching your story, appeal to their personal interests.

  • Sign up for the media outlet’s newsletters to stay up to date on what they focus on.
  • Follow the LinkedIn and Twitter feeds of the editor and journalists or influencers for each news source.
  • Always be educated on who they interview—from doctors to CEOs to other leading industry experts.

Journalists receive about 30 pitches a day and decline or don’t respond most of the time because it’s not relevant to what they cover. (Muckrack 2024)

Build symbiotic relationships

At some point, you need to introduce yourself and let your media contacts know you represent your company’s news. Ask what they may be interested in, so you don’t waste their time. Mention a few articles you enjoyed reading. Don’t ask them for anything other than to introduce yourself when you first reach out.

  • Attending a tradeshow? Ask the editor or journalist to stop by your booth for a short tour over coffee and introduce them to your subject matter experts, so they know your company has identified people that will help them with their job. If they decline, stop by their booth and ask them what they find most interesting from all the attendees. Just listen and learn!
  • Email your contacts when you have valid clinical data to share that builds up a technology. A lot of times, the editor will decline an article because your press release covers the news. That’s ok. Keep updating them on clinical data or milestones as they happen. Sourcing end users at the oncology center is always valuable information.
  • If there is an industry trend that is being discussed, ask your contacts what their views are or comment when appropriate. Be a part of their world by offering insights from your company’s subject matter experts.

Most articles are now published digitally (69%) compared to print (19%) so the positive news is your article is quick to be published and can be updated if or as needed. (Muckrack 2024)

Be the credible, go-to source

  • Have your subject matter experts prepped for interviews and readily available. This includes key opinion leaders that use your technology at hospitals and clinics and the researchers and clinical personnel at your company.
  • Write a contributed or bylined article. Unlike an article written by a reporter about a company or its products, these articles are authored by a thought leader at the company and are meant to lend a vendor-neutral perspective on topics relevant to a publication’s readers. Journalists are busy, so don’t forget to add value with assets (images, quotes, links, etc.)
  • Stay on top of industry trends and insert your company ASAP! As an example, a public figure announces a cancer diagnosis, it is covered in national and/or global news sources. Many doctors are interviewed on what the disease means and latest technologies to treat it, even if the person doesn’t share what treatments they will have. This is a great opportunity to offer your technology press contacts a list of FAQs and a doctor willing to speak on your technology for the disease. Patient education is always needed.

Journalists say their most trusted sources are subject matter experts (82%) over CEOs (46%) and company PR professionals. (Muckrack 2024)

G3 Medical Marketing offers expertise in media relations— from building press-ready materials to a solid rapport with news outlets that your stakeholders turn to for their news.

We’re here to:

  • Help you be seen as the industry expert
  • Position your company as a thought leader
  • Increase your visibility on news that matters
  • Help you quickly reach out to relevant news sources
  • Lead your company to other opportunities, including speaking engagements, interviews and quotes in leading media outlets

Reach out to find out how we can help you build a credible subject matter expert list and be prepared to share your company news whenever it happens!

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